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Tax Tips - July 2018

Does it pay to be married?

It is believed that there are likely to be a large number of married couples across the UK that would be entitled to the transfer of Marriage Allowance, but are still unaware of its existence.

The Marriage Allowance transfer was first introduced in the 2015/16 tax year and should not be confused with the age related Married Couple’s Allowance which is for people born before 6th April 1935.

To be entitled to Marriage Allowance you need to be either married or in a civil partnership, where both partners are no more than basic rate taxpayers.  The lower earner is able to transfer a fixed amount of 10% of their personal allowance to their spouse/civil partner which could either cover any tax that would have been due or reduce the amount of tax payable, depending on the level of their income.

For example: This tax year, Maria will only earn £5,200 from her part time job.  She has no other income so has £6,650 left of her £11,850 tax free personal allowance. This spare allowance is going to waste, but applying for the Marriage Allowance transfer she can transfer  £1,190 (rounded up to the next £10) of her allowance to her husband Richard, as long as his income isn’t taxable at the higher rate , i.e. over £46,350 (£43,430 if living in Scotland).  This transfer could save Richard up to £238 for this tax year.  If their circumstances were the same or similar over the last three years, then the claim can be backdated to 2015/16 when the allowance was first introduced.

Here’s what you could save each tax year:

2015/16 tax year - up to £212; 2016/17 tax year - up to £220; 2017/18 tax year - up to £230.

How to claim:

There are a number of ways that you can claim the allowance; online by either completing the questions on the online application at www.gov.uk/apply-marriage-allowance or from within your personal tax account. Alternatively by ringing HMRC on their helpline number, 0300 200 3300, or writing to them at H.M. Revenue and Customs, PAYE and Self-Assessment, BX9 1AS The contact needs to be from the person with the spare personal allowance as they are the one who will be making the transfer.

What if I haven’t got as much as 10% of my personal allowance spare?

You can still make a transfer of Marriage Allowance to your spouse/civil partner and although it will mean you will pay some tax it could be of benefit to you as a couple, as your spouse/civil partner would pay a lesser amount than they would have done, overall saving you money.

What if my spouse/civil partner has passed away and I haven’t made a claim?

A claim can still be made after one of the couple has passed away. You are able to backdate this to 2015/16 and any other subsequent years, where applicable.

For example: Mrs Roberts passed away in May 2018. For the years 2015/16, 2016/17 and 2017/18 Mrs Roberts was a taxpayer but Mr Roberts was a non-tax payer and if he had known, would have made a transfer to his wife to reduce her liability. For 2018/2019 due to the date she passed away and the income she received, Mrs Roberts was a non-taxpayer. However, Mr Roberts became a taxpayer for the first time in years.

In this case Mr Roberts can make a post-death claim to transfer 10% of his allowance for 2015/16, 2016/17 & 2017/18 to his wife, creating refunds for these years, and also claim 10% of Mrs Roberts’ allowance for 2018/2019 reducing his tax bill for this year.

This article is by Tax Help for Older People registered charity no 1102276 (Scotland no SC045819), offering free tax advice to older people on incomes below £20,000 a year. The Helpline number is 0845 601 3321 or geographical 01308 488066.